What is Wordsworth's argument regarding what it means to know one's self and the world at large in The Prelude, books I and V.can you focus in book I and book V in looking at the question in The...

What is Wordsworth's argument regarding what it means to know one's self and the world at large in The Prelude, books I and V.

can you focus in book I and book V in looking at the question in The Prelude by William Wordsworth. how is pantheism shown in book I and book V.

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thanatassa | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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In The Prelude, William Wordsworth's argument concerning his sense of knowledge of both self and the world is intimately tied to his conceptions of nature and childhood. He sees many of the trappings of civilization and learning as adding layers of artifice between the intellect and the true self and the self and nature. Thus part of self knowledge and knowledge of the world is the return to the innocent perspective of childhood we encounter in Book I. The journey of the poem, in recounting the poet`s university education and development shows a movement away from nature, and then in Book V, the beginnings of a rediscovery of the lost childhood innocence.

http://www.enotes.com/prelude-william-wordsworth-salem/prelude

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yakta | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) eNoter

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The journey of the poem, in recounting the poet`s university education and development shows a movement away from nature, and then in Book V, the beginnings of a rediscovery of the lost childhood innocence.

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