What is the percentage of elderly with type 2 diabetes? What is the primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention interventions for type 2 diabetes in older adults? How many of these elder...

What is the percentage of elderly with type 2 diabetes?

What is the primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention interventions for type 2 diabetes in older adults?

How many of these elder individuals have episodes due to improper documentation and regulation of their blood glucose levels and insulin injections?

Asked on by chaver

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Tamara K. H. | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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Type 2 diabetes is most definitely at epidemic proportions. Of those diagnosed with diabetes, 90 to 95 percent are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Plus, almost 26 million Americans have diabetes; hence, that statistic would be 90 to 95 percent out of 26 million people ("Type 2 Diabetes Statistics and Facts"). What's more, 22 to 33 percent of all 65-year-old adults or older have diabetes, and only 5 percent of adults are ever diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Hence, the majority of 65-year-old adults and older are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Scientists are linking the epidemic with increases in obesity among US citizens. They even expect diagnoses of diabetes among 65 year olds and older to "increase by 4.5-fold ... between 2005 and 2050" ("Diabetes in Older Adults").

The primary prevention intervention for type 2 diabetes would be trying to prevent it from developing at all, or at least trying to stop its further development. Primary prevention intervention is only useful at the pre-diabetes stage, the stage at which a person's blood glucose level is too high but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. For primary prevention intervention, we employ what can be called medical nutrition therapy (MNT). MNT simply refers to helping a patient develop healthier eating and lifestyle habits, which, if employed at the pre-diabetes stage, can help prevent any development of diabetes at all ("Nutrition Recommendations and Interventions for Diabetes"). Healthier eating habits would include eating less fried food, eating more chicken and fish, eating leaner beef, and eating more fruits and vegetables. Plus, since weight loss is essential for primary prevention intervention, a person must develop a moderate exercise routine ("What is Pre-Diabetes?"). Secondary and tertiary prevention interventions are useful in preventing type 2 diabetes from developing into even further stages. Secondary and tertiary prevention interventions would also include MNT ("Nutrition Recommendations").

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