What racist beliefs about the Mrunas do some of the ladies of the women's missionary society hold in Chapter 24 of To Kill a Mockingbird?CHAPTER 24 How do some of the ladies show racism about...

What racist beliefs about the Mrunas do some of the ladies of the women's missionary society hold in Chapter 24 of To Kill a Mockingbird?

CHAPTER 24

How do some of the ladies show racism about Tom's trial and their colored servants reaction to the trial's outcome?

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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When Aunt Alexandra invited her missionary circle over for tea in Chapter 24 of To Kill a Mockingbird, Scout saw that they were "fighting the good fight all over the house." The featured topic of the day was the "squalid lives" of the Mrunas, an uncivilized and un-Christian African tribe being tended to by a missionary supported by their church. The women promised to give their full support for the cause of civilizing the Mrunas, who, because of their uncivilized ways, "no white person'll go near 'em" but the missionary. The Mrunsas were full of "immorality... sin and squalor" as well as disease.

However, during a break for refreshments, several of the women spoke harshly of the African-American men and women in their own town. Mrs. Merriweather was upset at the dissatisfaction of "the cooks and field hands" about the outcome of the Tom Robinson trial. She believed that if they knew that the town's white people had forgiven them, all would be forgotten. Mrs. Merriweather referred to Tom as a "darky," and she later commented that she had considered firing her "sulky" maid, Sophy, if she had kept complaining about it. She later condemned President Roosevelt's wife for coming to Birmingham "to sit with 'em." 

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