With more and more managers using computers, they'll be able to make more rational decisions.Do you agree or disagree with this statement? Why

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auntlori's profile pic

Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Of course bad decisions can still be made by those who use a computer, manager or not.  As mentioned above, computers are only as accurate as what's been entered into them, and we've all heard the phrase "garbage in, garbage out." 

Some things, though, are certainly easier and less frustrating with a computer (tracking inventory and ordering supplies, for example).  The "rational" things, I presume, are things like scheduling--which still need some human elements to complete. 

So there it is:  The manager's "favorites" may still never have to work weekends, but they'll undoubtedly have enough inventory to sell.  Perhaps that's as rational as it's going to get.

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Irrational decisions can still be made with a computer.  The presence of technology is merely a tool amongst many in the hands of a manager.  Simply because it is used does not automatically guarantee that decisions are made in a more rational manner or with a greater amount of rationality.  One can hope that the effective use of computers can help to display and organize data in a manner that represents efficiency and rationality.  Yet, the actual decisions themselves will still be based upon the manager's willingness to take and synthesize information and solicit information from multiple avenues.  This will represent more rational decisions than the use of computers by itself will be.

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lfawley | College Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted on

I think that if the choice is to agree or disagree, I would have to disagree. The problem with a computer is that it is only as "smart" as the data that is entered by the user. Computers, no matter how good they are, are subject to errors. Additionally, the information that one gets from a computer (for instance, research collected from on line sources) is only as good as the information that was entered into that source. As more and more managers use computers, the degree to which they will use the data they collect is directly related to how much they trust the information they receive electronically and how well they fact-check information. A computer can be an excellent tool for analyzing data, and that can be extremely helpful in determining what management decisions work and what management decisions fall short of the intended goal. But, even when looking at this data, the manager himself or herself must look rationally at the quality of the data and the reliability of the data that was being analyzed. Ultimately, rational decision making is a human quality, not a machine quality.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I think that this only applies to a limited range of managerial decisions.  Other aspects of what managers must decide cannot really be helped by computers.

When managers have to make decisions about the technical details of their operations, computers can surely help.  They can be used to collect and analyze data that will allow the managers to make their operations move more efficiently (like how UPS has used computers to figure out the most efficient routes so as to save on fuel costs).

However, much of management consists of human interactions.  Computers cannot really help a manager understand how best to motivate workers or to keep them at a high level of job satisfaction.

krishna-agrawala's profile pic

krishna-agrawala | College Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

Rational decisions are based on reality as it exists rather than based on assumptions, emotions, or personal preferences. Use of information does not automatically eliminate the personal preferences and biases contributing to managers deviating from a rational decision making process. However computers do provide the managers with a tool to gain better understanding of reality. Computers do this by enabling managers to get better information and analysis on matters that influence their decisions.

So managers will definitely be able to make more rational decisions with the help of computers. But this does not mean that a manager will definitely use computers to improve rationality of their decisions.

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