With dramatic irony, the writer lets the reader in on the secret, sharing information one or more of the character does not know in "The Cask of Amontillado" by Edgar Allan Poe. What do you learn...

With dramatic irony, the writer lets the reader in on the secret, sharing information one or more of the character does not know in "The Cask of Amontillado" by Edgar Allan Poe. What do you learn in the first two paragraphs about Montresor's plans for Fortunato? 

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thanatassa | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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"The Cask of Amontillado" by Edgar Allan Poe is narrated in the first person by Montresor. He claims that not only did Fortunato injure him at some time before the murder but that Fortunato had in some way insulted him as well. Not only does Montresor want revenge, but he also wants to make sure that he succeeds in completing his plans of vengeance without getting caught. 

The most important information is supplied in the second paragraph where Montresor describes how he has lulled the potential suspicions of Fortunato by not giving any hint of his enmity but instead smiling and projecting good will. Thus Fortunato thinks of Montresor as a friend, rather than knowing that Montresor is plotting to murder him. 

This dissimulation not only serves to dupe Fortunato but gives the reader a notion of the genuine evil of Montresor's character.

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