With the advent of the Internet and its social and news websites, is the newspaper is becoming extinct? With the advent of the Internet and its social and news websites, is the newspaper is becoming extinct?

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I'm afraid so.  The age of electronic information is here (as much as we may detest that fact).  Just look at the decline of The New York Times .  It wasn't long ago when this was the newspaper of choice.  Now, it's struggling to stay out of bankruptcy.  What is...

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I'm afraid so.  The age of electronic information is here (as much as we may detest that fact).  Just look at the decline of The New York Times.  It wasn't long ago when this was the newspaper of choice.  Now, it's struggling to stay out of bankruptcy.  What is more interesting is looking at the ages of those answering.  : )  In my own life, I have found that people older than 40 are quite beholden to their papers, people in their thirties don't mind either way, and those younger than thirty prefer electronic information.  I am in the middle category with one exception, . . . books.  I can't imagine that I will EVER read a book in electronic format.  I love to "flip" pages, especially as the teacher of Literature that I am.  But then again, notice that I didn't say "never."  ; )

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With the advent of the Internet and its social and news websites, is the newspaper is becoming extinct?

With the advent of the Internet and its social and news websites, is the newspaper is becoming extinct?

  This is a great question.  I think the newspaper is going to have to undergo really radical change in order to meet the needs of the next generation of news consumers.  Even putting aside the 24/7 news cycle that has become the norm, the reality today is that those under 35 or 40 are increasingly likely to obtain their news from an Internet source, and blogs are only part of the spectrum from which to choose.  Social networking, for example, is having a tremendous effect on how consumers receive information and, more importantly, how they interact with their information and with others receiving that same information.  They want collaboration, sharing, interaction - not a one on one, feed me the news model.  And, with twitter becoming so incredibly popular as a serious means of transmitting news as it happens, it becomes hard to imagine how newspapers, as they are presently structured, can hope to keep up.  If they want to keep up, they need to go to a more in depth, scholarly approach that is often missing in the rapid world of the Internet.

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krishna-agrawala (post 8) is absolutely correct--"tomorrow we will miss what we have today."

I used to be one of those people who resisted any kind of technological advances. It took me forever to break down and get cable TV, and I was the last of my friends to install an answering machine in my house. I was a daily newspaper subscriber and loved sitting down in the morning with my coffee to look over the daily paper.

15 years later, I have evolved to the point where I have a BlackBerry, no land line, and my newspaper subscription is only for the Sunday paper. I read my news online, but I love to sit down on Sunday with a Bloody Mary and peruse the big Sunday paper at my leisure. I open it up, put the sections in the order I want to read them, pull out the advertisements and save only the coupon sections so I can clip them later, and set in for my Sunday read. I save the comics for last, and I finish up by doing the giant crossword.

I don't miss the daily newspaper, because I am able to get that online. I really enjoy booting up my laptop in the mornings and opening my tab that starts my day. This activity has replaced my hard copy morning newspaper. I still have a cup of coffee with it, though.

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I would hate to see traditional newspapers become completely extinct, if only for the treasured experience of reading every single section of a Sunday newspaper, then doing the giant crossword puzzle by hand in ink.

Nevertheless, I do fear that print newspapers will be largely phased out over time. The ease of finding information on the internet and the ubiquity of personal computers has forced print journalism into massive change, much of which has been reactionary on the part of the newspaper industry.

Timbrady is correct that newspapers will suvive if advertisers support them. Everything in the business world comes down to dollars and cents.

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This was just an issue being discussed on the Colbert Report the other night.

I think newspapers are in trouble, unfortunately.  I will be honest - I do not read the actual paper on a regular basis.  I enjoy reading the "fun" parts of the Sunday paper, but for news stories, weather, etc. I go to a web site.  I check the web site for our local paper almost daily, to see if there are any updates in the discussions about school budgets next year.  But if I can do that for free from my computer, why would I pay a subscription fee?

Today's younger generation is web-savvy.  When you have access to worldwide papers online at the click of a button, why subscribe to only one?  I will admit, there are certain features that are usually only available in print (such as the comics, the regular classifieds, etc.).  However, the "hard-hitting news stories" are generally published online and therefore available for free and without waiting for delivery of the paper. 

If newspapers want to survive, they will have to learn how to compete with the variety and speed of information available online.

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I certainly hope not!  I, for one, enjoy reading the paper on the weekends over my morning coffee.  I enjoy clipping coupons and reading the book reviews.  It's fun for my kids to read the funnies and to help me decide what to do and where to go in our area when events crop up...especially those small town crafts and festivals that are all over during spring and summer breaks.  They are a great read, but they are also useful for so many other things:

I remember using old newspapers to make patterns for doll clothes and later, big people clothes with my grandmother and mother.  We used the paper for paper mache, for building boats to float on the pond, for making hats to march around the house in, and for packing items when we moved.  My grandmother read the paper religiously every day and then lined her bird cage with it.

What a tragedy if they all by the wayside.  An entire generation or two will be disappointed, and the newer generations will never know what they missed!

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I think they will exist if, and only if, advertisers think that they are a great place to spend their money.  The cost of the paper will never subsidize the total cost of publishing the paper.  If the Internet becomes a more efficient place to advertise, I think the papers might become extinct.  I hope they do not, because I prefer the experience of holding a paper and being able to take it wherever I go.

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No. The newspaper is not becoming extinct. However, it is like a living organism facing radical change in its environmental niche: it is under extreme pressure, and must adapt rapidly. Certainly, numerous individual newspapers will die, and quickly. They are the newspapers (organisms) that are ill-suited for rapid change, and/or that hold to strategies that are proving unsuitable. The newspapers that survive will, broadly speaking, do several things. First, they will identify which things are done best by a physical paper and which through electronic media. Second, they will do them. Third, they will build alliances with Internet resources, becoming hybrid publications.

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