Is William Blake the speaker in "The Tyger?" Please tell me why or why not.

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

William Blake was a Romantic poet. Based upon this, his poetry tended to revolve around the importance nature and imagination.

One could argue that, in the poem, Blake questioned nature and its role in the world. For the Romantics, nature was very important. The imagery of nature was used to...

See
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Get 48 Hours Free Access

William Blake was a Romantic poet. Based upon this, his poetry tended to revolve around the importance nature and imagination.

One could argue that, in the poem, Blake questioned nature and its role in the world. For the Romantics, nature was very important. The imagery of nature was used to allow readers to also question life and the things around them.

In "The Tyger," Blake (as the writer) questions

the creation of the tiger based solely upon the fact that he finds it hard to believe that the same hand (God's hand) created the lamb.

Given that, one can only assume that Blake is the speaker in the poem based upon the fact that he wrote the poem. The poem contains open-ended questions which force the reader to consider the answers. Unfortunately, for the reader, the questions are unanswerable. Therefore, given that Blake is wanting the reader to consider the creation of the "tyger," one could easily assume that Blake, himself, is the speaker.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team