Why would a Shakespearean audience have accepted the declaration of love between Beatrice and Benedick in "Much Ado about Nothing"? It has been said that other charaters have planted the...

Why would a Shakespearean audience have accepted the declaration of love between Beatrice and Benedick in "Much Ado about Nothing"?

It has been said that other charaters have planted the seeds and that Shakespear has just shocked his ausiebce (with the shaming) and he wants to alter their emotional response

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pmiranda2857 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Audiences in Shakespeare's time came to see his plays for pure entertainment.  Drama, satire, and plot twists make for a witty production.  Although Beatrice and Benedick appear to have a relationship based on sparring or fighting, it is just this type of arrangement that makes the joining of these characters so satisfying.  The audience loves this type of union. The players are more interesting.  There is nothing like a good argument between potential lovers to raise the interest of the audience, will they get together or won't they? 

Most critics concur that Shakespeare's depiction of the relationship between Beatrice and Benedick far surpasses that of Hero and Claudio in depth and interest. Scholars have often emphasized the fact that Shakespeare deliberately introduces the theme of the sparring mockers Beatrice and Benedick before the theme of the pallid romantics Hero and Claudio; and further, that when all of the principal characters are on stage together, the audience is drawn not to the tame love-at-first-sight relationship that develops between Hero and Claudio, but rather to the "merry war" between Beatrice and Benedick.

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Much Ado About Nothing

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