Why is Wilson covered with dust from the ashes in Chapter 2 ofThe Great Gatsby?

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The dust from the ashes may well be considered the fallout from the utter lack of moral certainty or any sense of morals at all in the upper class people, the subjects of most of the story.  Tom , who is completely at ease with his adultery with Myrtle cannot...

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The dust from the ashes may well be considered the fallout from the utter lack of moral certainty or any sense of morals at all in the upper class people, the subjects of most of the story.  Tom, who is completely at ease with his adultery with Myrtle cannot bother with any moral sense and sees nothing wrong with his actions.

But Wilson does actually see something wrong with it, once he learns what is going on, but he has already been destroyed by the lack of morals among the upper class, he is covered with the ashes of their destruction and cannot escape the consequences because he lacks the money or power to do so.

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