Why We Can't Wait Questions and Answers
by Martin Luther King Jr.

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Summarize Martin Luther King's depiction of "Bull Connor's Birmingham" in Why We Can't Wait.

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In April of 1963, when Dr. King's S.C.L.C. and local activist Fred Shuttlesworth's A.C.H.R joined forces in leading a campaign to desegregate Birmingham, Alabama, it was the most segregated city in the country. The response of one local official that "blood would run in the streets" before the city would comply with the Supreme Court's recent school desegregation decision spoke for much of the white citizenry. And indeed blood did run in the streets, as Dr. King describes in Why We Can't Wait, with seventeen unsolved bombings of African American churches and private homes between 1957 and 1963, added to the routine physical intimidation and beating of African American residents. Foremost in fomenting this atmosphere of violence to maintain Jim Crow laws, a status quo which limited blacks to menial labor, prohibited them from associating with whites in churches, schools, parks, or any other public facilities, and conspired to cripple their ability to vote, was Eugene "Bull"...

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