Why was theater vilified? Why did some people in Elizabethan England feel that the theater was a bad thing? 

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It does seem odd that something as celebrated as Elizabethan theater was not universally well received during its own time. There are a number of reasons for this. For starters, theaters were viewed as a public health issue. With so many people gathering together in one place, many saw the...

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It does seem odd that something as celebrated as Elizabethan theater was not universally well received during its own time. There are a number of reasons for this. For starters, theaters were viewed as a public health issue. With so many people gathering together in one place, many saw the theaters as places where diseases could easily spread. Plagues were a constant threat during this period. With so many people of all social classes gathered together, coupled with the fact that there were no public toilets at theaters leading to people relieving themselves outside, even the best theaters could be breeding grounds for plagues. For this reason, there were actually very few theaters within the city of London. Theaters were also places where prostitutes frequented, further adding to their bad reputation.

Also, in the days before good artificial lighting, plays were performed during the daytime. This meant that audience members would miss a day of work to attend a play, adding to their reputation as detrimental to a good work ethic.

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Theatre is a form of expression, and allows for citizens to express their views about politics and society.  In a way its freedom of speech and can be used as protest.  The Queen and other of noble power might feel that the theatre will go against them and show the citizens a whole new light about their leaders. 

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