Why was the establishment of judicial review important to the concept of checks and balances?

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The establishment of judicial review was important to the concept of checks and balances because it strongly discouraged the United States Congress and the president from enacting unconstitutional laws. Among the three branches of the federal government—legislative, executive, and judicial—there is ideally a balance of power: none of them should...

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The establishment of judicial review was important to the concept of checks and balances because it strongly discouraged the United States Congress and the president from enacting unconstitutional laws. Among the three branches of the federal government—legislative, executive, and judicial—there is ideally a balance of power: none of them should have substantial or ongoing power over the other two. The Supreme Court can weigh in on the constitutionality of any given law. The knowledge that the court has the power to nullify legislation is considered a deterrent to passing legislation that goes against constitutional principles. The justices are appointed for life rather than elected for limited periods, so judicial review is also generally considered a means to counteract short-term political trends.

The practical beginnings of judicial review at the federal level were established with the Supreme Court’s decision on the Marbury v. Madison case in 1803. Chief Justice John Marshall stated, “A Law repugnant to the Constitution is void.” The court’s decision marked the first time that it had declared a law unconstitutional

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