Why was the scientific revolution so revolutionary?

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The Scientific Revolution was revolutionary because man started to look for reason and cause-and-effect relationships in natural phenomena.  Before, planets moved, people got sick, and objects moved all according to the will of God.  During the Scientific Revolution, men such as Newton, Galileo, Copernicus, and Darwin looked for trends as...

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The Scientific Revolution was revolutionary because man started to look for reason and cause-and-effect relationships in natural phenomena.  Before, planets moved, people got sick, and objects moved all according to the will of God.  During the Scientific Revolution, men such as Newton, Galileo, Copernicus, and Darwin looked for trends as to why things happened, and they found patterns in nature.  Newton discovered motion laws.  Galileo and Copernicus were famous astronomers who made notes of planetary motion, and Darwin looked at how animals adapt to their habitats over time.  Many times scientists of this period were able to use improved mathematical concepts; calculus was developed during this time in order to make precise measurements in the field of physics.  Even though the Church protested many of these achievements as they thought it would disprove God, many of these scientists of the early modern period such as Newton, Galileo, and Darwin were really quite devout.  This secularization of science made it accessible to more people and encouraged generations of future thinkers to make more improvements and discoveries.   

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