Why was the Battle of Midway significant?

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The Battle of Midway occurred between June 4th and June 7th, 1942, six months after the attack on Pearl Harbor. This battle served as a decisive victory for the United States in which Japan became weaker and weaker in military strength until the end of Japan's participation in World War...

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The Battle of Midway occurred between June 4th and June 7th, 1942, six months after the attack on Pearl Harbor. This battle served as a decisive victory for the United States in which Japan became weaker and weaker in military strength until the end of Japan's participation in World War II. During this naval battle, the US used aircrafts to viciously bomb Japanese naval ships. After this decisive battle, the US continued to out-produce Japan in terms of weapons production and continued to show more and more military strength. The battle was such a turning point because until that point, Japan had an upper hand within the Pacific Theatre and were aiming to use a victory during the Battle of Midway to secure their dominance in the Pacific Theatre. However, when Japan lost this battle, they lost their dominance in the Pacific Theatre permanently. When the US won this battle, they were able to establish a submarine base at Midway and further extend military operations.

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The Battle of Midway was important because it was the turning point in the Pacific theater during World War II. This was the first naval battle in which the ships never fired on each other directly, but both sides used their airplanes to attack the enemy. The United States military intercepted Japanese naval codes and were able to set a trap for the Japanese fleet. The Japanese navy lost four aircraft carriers and suffered 2,500 casualties, while the United States lost one aircraft carrier and suffered a little over three hundred casualties. Japan was not able to capture Midway Island. After this battle, the Japanese Empire started to erode slowly each month as the United States produced more munitions—Japan simply could not match the United States in terms of production. Japan was also hurt by the amount of trained aircraft mechanics who went down with the ships.

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