Why are there no immiscible layers when bromine water is added to a polar solvent when immiscible layers are formed when bromine water reacts with hexane?I know that Bromine water is non polar so...

Why are there no immiscible layers when bromine water is added to a polar solvent when immiscible layers are formed when bromine water reacts with hexane?

I know that Bromine water is non polar so it doesn't really make sense when it is added with a polar solvent.  Could you explain the chemistry that is going on rather than just describe it?

Asked on by first50

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ncchemist | eNotes Employee

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I'm afraid you are mistaken about bromine water being nonpolar and that is the crux of the problem here.  Naturally occurring bromine is Br2 meaning two atoms of bromine are bound together via a covalent bond.  Bromine is one of the very few elements that exists naturally as a liquid.  Small amounts of it are soluble in water; this is what you are calling bromine water.  Since bromine water consists mostly of water, it behaves much like water in terms of polarity.  And we know that water is a highly polar solvent, so bromine water will readily mix with polar solvents like methanol and will form a biphasic mixture with nonpolar solvents like hexane.  Bromine (Br2) itself is also soluble in many organic solvents so perhaps that is what you were thinking of.

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