Why are there more lunar eclipses than solar eclipses?

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It all has to do with sizes and distances. The moon is about 240,000 miles from the earth. That sounds like a long distance for sure. But relatively speaking, the moon is a lot closer to the earth than it...

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That's a cool question, and it has a cool answer.

It all has to do with sizes and distances. The moon is about 240,000 miles from the earth. That sounds like a long distance for sure. But relatively speaking, the moon is a lot closer to the earth than it is to the sun... almost 400 times closer. Because of this relative closeness, when the earth (which also is a lot bigger than the moon) comes between the sun and the moon, the shadow of the earth (which causes an eclipse) has a pretty good chance, each month when there's a full moon, of blocking out the moon. Conversely, a relatively small moon 240,000 miles away from the earth has a much smaller chance of blocking out a very distant (and apparently small) sun which, in the sky, as seen from the earth, looks almost excatly the same size as the moon.

Although not drawn to scale, the link below may help you understand the relationships better.

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