Raymond's Run Questions and Answers
by Toni Cade Bambara

Raymond's Run book cover
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Why is the story called "Raymond's Run" instead of Squeaky's run?

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Gretchen Mussey eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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The story is about an athletic, adolescent girl nicknamed Squeaky, who decides to coach her mentally disabled brother after seeing him run alongside her during the fifty-yard dash. Despite the fact that Squeaky is the protagonist, the story is more about her decision to coach her brother, Raymond, at the end of the story. While Squeaky's performance at the May Day races is significant, her selfless decision to focus her attention on helping her mentally disabled brother compete at track and field is more important and illustrates her maturation. Therefore, it is Raymond's athletic talent and ability to run that takes precedence in the story instead of Squeaky's performance at the May Day races. The alliteration in the title "Raymond's Run" is also more aesthetically pleasing and enjoyable to hear in comparison to the title "Squeaky's Run."

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ladyvols1 eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Besides the aliteration in the title "Raymond Runs," sounds better than Squeak's Run, "As the title suggests, not only Hazel’s but Raymond’s run has implications for both characters. The title points not only to Raymond’s own potential as an athlete, but also to Hazel’s intuitive recognition of his possibilities, a recognition that redefines her. " 

"When Hazel, is in the May race, she looks over and sees Raymond running along the outside of the fense.  She is able to see him in a new way.  Raymond is not just modeling her, but ‘‘running in his very own style.’’ Through him, her difficult and somewhat lonely struggle to define herself suddenly widens to include a connection that empowers them both. The realization of Raymond’s potential, something that has always been there, enriches Hazel’s sense of her own possibilities."

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