Why is spring time so poignant a time for "The Widow's Lament in Springtime"?Please comment on my answer: In this poem, a widow is talking about her feelings in this first spring after her husband...

Why is spring time so poignant a time for "The Widow's Lament in Springtime"?

Please comment on my answer:

In this poem, a widow is talking about her feelings in this first spring after her husband has died.  The poem expresses her sadness at losing him and she lives in a deep sadness because she lost her husband. The poet is a contrived poet who could mix the beauty of the nature with sadness in human life. The nature plays a great role of inspiration for the poet.
She tried to connect the grief that the woman feels with the beauty of nature. However he narrated a sad story but he chose the best season in whole year which is spring. The woman compared this season in the last year with the same season this year by using  ("formerly" and "before" to "this year" and "today," all bring into focus the immediacy of her loss") to express her experience at this time of year. Her look towards the two springs changed.
In the first spring, her husband was alive and the elements of nature gave different sense in contrast this year.
The season of spring is different from the others. It means the warmth so the life goes easily. The trees become green and carry different colors of fruit and she loved that. The diseases become less. But now this all makes her sad.  It makes her sad (is poignant) because spring is a beautiful time and it is the time of year associated with new life.  So it is poignant to think about her husband who is dead during this beautiful time of new life.In fact, the spring is the season of rebirth.

Asked on by tagrid

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

You seem to have some very good ideas in your answer, but you do need to go through it and check the English and phrasings that you use. In particular, be careful about which person you use to refer to the poet (you use "she" at one stage instead of "he").

Central to this poem is the way that springtime, which, as the speaker in the poem clearly indicates, is a time of rebirth and new life, contrasts harshy and discordantly with the speaker's own feelings and experiences at having lost her husband. To her, the birth of nature almost mocks the way that she has completely lost her husband. He, unlike nature, cannot be reborn or find life again. This explains the poignancy of this poem and how grief and beauty coexist from the very beginning:

Sorrow is my own yard

Where the new grass

Flames as it has flamed

Often before...

Thus it is that the "grief" in the "heart" of the speaker is "stronger" than the colours of the blossom, and spring time this year only serves to make her want to die herself, sinking into the marsh near the flowers that are mentioned at the end.

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