Why should someone support the annexation of Texas?  

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mkoren eNotes educator| Certified Educator

There were several reasons why people should have supported the annexation of Texas. For southerners, the annexation of Texas of was an easy decision. Texas would be a slave state since slavery existed in Texas. This would give the South another slave state. Southerners were concerned that more and more free states would be entering the Union in the future. The slave states were worried that they would eventually be outnumbered in Congress in the not too distant future. They were concerned this would cause problems in the future for the slave states.

While many northerners opposed the annexation of Texas because it was going to be a slave state, there were reasons why northerners should have also supported its annexation. While putting the slavery question aside was very difficult for many northerners since slavery was becoming more and more of an issue, annexing Texas offered many advantages to our country. We had a desire, as expressed in our policy of Manifest Destiny, of spreading from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean. We needed to annex Texas in order to accomplish this goal. Annexing Texas would be good for our economy. Texas is a huge state. A large amount of cotton was being grown in Texas. Our economy would benefit by adding Texas, selling its cotton, and providing products to Texas. Industries and transportation could also expand to Texas, allowing our economy to grow. Northerners should have realized that several new states were about to join the Union. These states would be free states. If they were thinking of the best interests of the country instead of the best interests of the North, they would have realized that annexing Texas would have been the wise action to take.

There were several benefits to annexing Texas. It is too bad the northerners refused to allow Texas to become a state when it first wanted to join the Union in 1836. Texas had to wait until 1845 before becoming a state.

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