Why should corporal punishment not be banned? I have to debate on this topic and I am at the affirmative side.  I have to suppose that the corporal should not be banned.

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I agree with post #7.  I think that corporal punishment is more likely to be effective in school than at home.  If it were to become institutionalized as it was before, it would be controlled.  Schools are never going to be beating children, but if they use controlled corporal punishment it is not likely to be harmful.  You can, as others have said, rely on historical evidence.

Remember that to win a debate, you have to either argue that there is not a problem or that this is not the solution.  This resolution seems to assume that corporal punishment already exists in your school or state.  You can argue that it is a deterrent, either for committing misbehavior or committing it in the future.

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Many of a particular generation would agree with this point of view, so it is worth considering what they base their judgement upon. They would look at society today and argue that there is a lack of discipline which was not present back in the "good old days" of corporal punishment. Having such a severe offence meant that there was a clearly defined system of punishments and consequences for bad behaviour which meant that children grew up with proper respect for their elders.

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Perhaps you could compare corporal punishment in schools to the effectiveness of corporal punishment in the home.  I realize they are different arenas, but certainly an analogy worth conisering.  When administered with consistency and love, and followed up correctly by parents, spanking, as a form of discipline, is effective.  While the issue of corporal punishment may be hard to research (for the affirmative) you are likely to find many in favor of parental spanking.

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I agree that you have the more difficult side of this debate to defend. I would argue that younger children are more likely to respond to the immediate consequence of swats at school immediately after the misbehavior than they are to being left out of an activity, such as recess, two hours later, or to being suspended for the next school day.

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You can also come at the topic from the angle of school security.  Discipline is lacking in many public schools, and violence and classroom disorder interfere with learning pretty regularly in the inner cities.  Reinstituting corporal punishment might return some semblance of control at the elementary levels anyway.

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If I were going to argue this side, I would do so by arguing from tradition.  In other words, I would argue that the evidence of past traditions shows that corporal punishment is not a bad thing.

I would argue that generations of children were subjected to corporal punishment and did not come out of it in any way warped by the experience.  I would argue that there were actually fewer discipline problems back in the old days when corporal punishment was more common.

Finally, I would look at the evidence against corporal punishment and I would try to pick holes in it.  I would argue that social scientists cannot really prove that corporal punishment causes resentment or that it causes kids to become more violent.  I would argue that there are all sorts of other factors that play into how a kid will behave.

So I would argue that A) corporal punishment didn't ruin kids for generations and generations and B) that social science is an imprecise thing that cannot definitively prove that corporal punishment is bad.

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You have, in my opinion, been given the more difficult side in this debate.  However, you have to work with what you have been given, and I think some research might help you.  There are still several states in which corporal punishment is legal, and I am sure some other countries permit it, too.  You might discover that students are less likely to misbehave in schools that do have it.  For example, there might be better attendance, less tardiness, fewer suspensions, and better academic performance.  You might also do a historical comparison, comparing the period during which corporal punishment was common, which was certainly throughout most of the history of public education in the United States. Another method of supporting your position is to compare education to parenting.  Is there any benefit, for example, to spanking one's children?  There are many people who believe there are benefits to doing so.  Remember, you do not have to agree with a position to debate it.  You must simply support the position.   I have provided a few links to get you started in your research.  Good luck! 

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