Why does Roger want to be trusted in "Thank You, M'am"?

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Langston Hughes, author of "Thank You M'am," was part of the Harlem Renaissance. He is known for his poetry, short stories, children's stories, and journalism talents.

In "Thank You M'am," Hughes introduces us to Mrs. Luella Bates Washington Jones, a no nonsense, sturdy working woman who Roger has the...

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Langston Hughes, author of "Thank You M'am," was part of the Harlem Renaissance. He is known for his poetry, short stories, children's stories, and journalism talents.

In "Thank You M'am," Hughes introduces us to Mrs. Luella Bates Washington Jones, a no nonsense, sturdy working woman who Roger has the misfortune of choosing to try and rob. After the initial shock of being knocked down and then snatched up by Mrs. Jones, Roger is then dragged to her home. Roger realizes that Mrs. Jones is not only a force to reckon with but a woman whose respect he appears to want.

Once she has him home, she sets an expectation that he will behave properly as she feeds him, sharing her small meal with him despite his attempt to rob her. Her actions make him want her to trust him but also challenge his trustworthiness as she leaves her purse, the initial target of his theft, within easy sight. Roger realizes that she is treating him as she would expect to be treated, trusting him, and feeding him so he does not take her purse and flee at moments when he could. Roger sits and eats with her, proving she can trust him.

In the end, she rewards his trustworthy behavior by handing him the money he meant to steal.

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