Why is Robert Hooke important to the study of cells?

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Hooke is most famously known for coining the term "cell."  At the time, Hooke's microscope was one of the best ever produced.  It was a compound microscope with a light source.  In essence it's the same type of microscope students around the country use in class.  He used it to...

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Hooke is most famously known for coining the term "cell."  At the time, Hooke's microscope was one of the best ever produced.  It was a compound microscope with a light source.  In essence it's the same type of microscope students around the country use in class.  He used it to study all kinds of microscopic creatures.  In 1665 he published his book Micrographia which detailed his observations and included drawings. Going back to his contribution of the word cell, it's an amusing piece of history, because Hooke wasn't actually looking at a living cell.  Hooke was using his microscope to examine thin pieces of cork.  The sections of the cork reminded Hooke of the cells monks used within monasteries.  His published words are as follows: 

". . . I could exceedingly plainly perceive it to be all perforated and porous, much like a Honey-comb, but that the pores of it were not regular. . . . these pores, or cells, . . . were indeed the first microscopical pores I ever saw, and perhaps, that were ever seen, for I had not met with any Writer or Person, that had made any mention of them before this. . ."

In summary, Hooke is important to the study of cells because he greatly improved the microscope, microscopy, and coined the term "cell" as we use it today. 

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