Two separate illustrations of an animal head and a fire on a mountain

Lord of the Flies

by William Golding
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Why does Ralph not descend into savagery?

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This is a very interesting question that is not completely true. Ralph does experience minor lapses in civility by continually forgetting the importance of maintaining a signal fire and participating in Simon 's brutal death. Despite Ralph's lapses in civility, he does not completely descend into savagery like the majority...

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This is a very interesting question that is not completely true. Ralph does experience minor lapses in civility by continually forgetting the importance of maintaining a signal fire and participating in Simon's brutal death. Despite Ralph's lapses in civility, he does not completely descend into savagery like the majority of boys on the island. One could assume that Ralph's childhood and background play a significant role in his ability to reject a life of savagery. Ralph's father is a commander in the British Navy, which implies that he grew up in a structured, civil home. One can assume that Ralph's father instilled morals in his son and raised him to obey the laws of civilization, which is why Ralph understands the importance of establishing a civil society on the uninhabited tropical island. Ralph is also the elected leader of the group and feels a sense of moral obligation to protect everyone by creating a civil society. Ralph's structured upbringing and obligation as chief motivate him to maintain his civility and not descend into savagery. Ralph's friendship with Piggy and hostile relationship with Jack are also motivating factors that allow him to reject a life of savagery and remain civil.

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