Why does the poet describe Richard Cory as always human?

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Richard Cory is depicted as a wealthy, classy man, who is relatively humble and kind. Richard Cory is portrayed as being a "gentleman from sole to crown" and "quietly arrayed," which indicates that he exercises a certain amount of humility as he walks downtown among the less fortunate. In addition...

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Richard Cory is depicted as a wealthy, classy man, who is relatively humble and kind. Richard Cory is portrayed as being a "gentleman from sole to crown" and "quietly arrayed," which indicates that he exercises a certain amount of humility as he walks downtown among the less fortunate. In addition to being described as a revered man, who seems to glitter and flutter as he walks, Richard Cory is also a friendly person. He goes out of the way to say "Good-morning" to the working-class citizens and the narrators say, "he [Richard Cory] was always human when he talked." The reason Edwin Arlington Robinson humanizes Richard Cory by depicting him as a conscious, friendly man is to create sympathy for his character, which emphasizes the impact of his tragic death. Richard is "always human" because he does not act superior to others and casually addresses the working-class citizens as he walks past them. Despite Richard Cory's advantages in life, the audience feels sorry for him because he was a compassionate man, who suffered from alienation and loneliness.

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