Why are people disgusted by bisexuals, gays or lesbians? I mean, they have their life, right? What right do people have to judge them by the gender of the person they like? Are people just afraid of accepting new things? Okay, 'disgusted' might be a strong word.. How about 'unaccepting'?

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This question already has many answers for both sides of the question.  I'm simply adding what being 64 has taught me.  I have a gay brother who didn't "come out of the closet" until he was in  his 30s. Living a life of hiding caused him to drink to the point...

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This question already has many answers for both sides of the question.  I'm simply adding what being 64 has taught me.  I have a gay brother who didn't "come out of the closet" until he was in  his 30s. Living a life of hiding caused him to drink to the point of alcoholism, have a car accident in which he almost hurt three children, and divorce a wife he never should have married.  Now that he is his real self, he is successful in business, is a stepfather to his ex-wife's married daughter, has quit drinking and is a true contributor to society.  With the current research into the human brain, the findings are showing that humans are born gay, that their brains are different than the brain of a straight person.  My brother has since told me that he knew he was different by the age of six, and that he also needed to hide his difference.  If someone is born gay, how can it be wrong to be gay?  God  does NOT make junk, and therefore, I can only conclude that if they are born this way, we have no right to try to change them or do anything but allow them to live their lives.

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Perhaps those people who think that homosexuality is disgusting should watch this enlightening TED presentation on the link between the natural reaction of 'disgust' and the confusion it causes with our false ideas of moral behaviour.

Perhaps those people who think that homosexuality is disgusting should watch this enlightening TED presentation on the link between the natural reaction of 'disgust' and the confusion it causes with our false ideas of moral behaviour.

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Speaking for the older generations, I can simply point out that homosexual and bisexual practices were usually kept secret by their participants in the decades before the 1960s and 1970s. Having never witnessed blatant  homosexual/bisexual contact until I was a teenager, I was shocked when I first saw two guys making out in high school (the mid-1970s); it became more coomonplace after I entered college. I'm sure my parents (born in the 1920s) never witnessed such contact until it became more acceptable in the 1970s. As another post mentioned, "people don't like what they don't understand," so for many people, disgust with gay/lesbian activity stems from an upbringing void of such activity. Of course, some people are totally closeminded when it comes to things of which they disapprove, and the complete acceptance of non-heterosexual practices will probably never materialize.

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I'll give luiji the benefit of the doubt, and assume that he did not intend to convey the meaning that frizzyperm ascribed to his post. I do agree, however, with much of what frizzyperm says in general, and particularly his statement that many people want to see themselves as "normal." Religion plays a major role in this for many people, but there are many other aspects of society that are heteronormative. Schools, advertising, sports, and families, not to mention the law, are just a few examples of social structures and practices that promote this outlook. For me, and I am just one person, tolerance began with recognizing that these norms are not immutable, and that they have been, and continue to be constructed. While this certainly demonstrates just how silly it all is, it also suggests that things might be different in the future. In fact, I would argue that despite a number of setbacks, the public view of homosexuality is far more favorable than it was even 20 years ago.  

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I have read estimates that perhaps 10% of the human population is gay. And of course, until recently, many gay people were "in the closet," so this presented even fewer opportunities to know a gay person.  The only way to reduce or eliminate prejudice is through exposure, as we have learned through the integration of housing, school, and education.  The people who seem most prejudiced to me seem to be the people who have had little exposure to gay people, unable to realize they are people, just like anyone else, because they have not had that human interaction that would make them realize this. 


The other difficulty I see is the extreme position taken in some religions, that being gay is a sin.  It is difficult to persuade people that their religious beliefs might be incorrect, because they are beliefs, having no basis in any evidence that shows that gay people are simply people who want to love as they are born to do.  


It is very sad to me to see anyone making judgements on the basis of whom one chooses to love or have sex with.  As long as two people are of age, I am not clear on why what they do is anyone's business. 

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There are many reasons for this.  One is that our sexual urges are so deeply rooted that it can be very hard for us to accept other sexual urges.  We can easily understand someone else liking a food we don't.  But when it comes to something as strong as sexual urges, it is much harder to understand and accept urges that don't appeal to us.

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People usually don't like what they don't understand.  If someone is different, they are suspicious.  This is the darker side of human nature.  Also, if it is acceptable in society to be prejudiced, more people will be.

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