• Why does Nora purposely earn Ds for Stephen in Andrew Clements' The Report Card?
  • What are three facts Nora says about herself?
  • How old was Nora when she began to read?
  • Why did Nora act like a cat in kindergarten?
  • Why did Nora decide to become a copycat?
  • What are two qualities Nora really likes about Stephen?
  • What caused Stephen to change and get mad at himself?
  • Why is 5th grade so important?
  • What kind of students are Nora's siblings?
  • What is your opinion of each family member reading his/her report card grades aloud at the dinner table and why?
  • Why does Nora refuse to read her grades?
  • What is your opinion of her parents making her stay at the dinner table until she reads her grades?
  • Expert Answers

    An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

    In Andrew Clements' The Report Card, Nora intentionally earns Ds on her fifth-grade report card as a plan to boost Stephen's self-esteem. Nora has always admired her best friend Stephen because, even though he is an average learner, he is also a very hard worker, as well...

    See
    This Answer Now

    Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

    Get 48 Hours Free Access

    In Andrew Clements' The Report Card, Nora intentionally earns Ds on her fifth-grade report card as a plan to boost Stephen's self-esteem.

    Nora has always admired her best friend Stephen because, even though he is an average learner, he is also a very hard worker, as well as a kind and caring person. By fourth grade, she begins noticing he is dreading school and working less hard, all because he earned low scores during the Connecticut Mastery Testing, tests that determined placement in fifth grade. Stephen had felt so pressured by his parents and himself to do well that, instead of doing well on the tests, he did very poorly. More importantly, he began seeing himself as "one of the dumb kids," which Nora knew was untrue (p. 24).

    Nora, a secret genius, understands that grades are not a true reflection of how smart or dumb a person is:

    Bad test grades do not mean you are dumb, and I am not in trouble. (p. 49)

    Since Nora knows this to be true, she intentionally earned bad grades as part of her plan to prove it to him and to raise his self-esteem.

    Approved by eNotes Editorial Team