Why might citizens not want to become involved in community policing efforts? be specific

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I think that one reason a citizen might not want to be involved with community policing efforts is that there is all of the risk with none of the authority.  Citizens don't carry weapons and can't make arrests.  They can look out for one another and report back to the police,...

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I think that one reason a citizen might not want to be involved with community policing efforts is that there is all of the risk with none of the authority.  Citizens don't carry weapons and can't make arrests.  They can look out for one another and report back to the police, but they have no actual power.  I imagine it would seem a bit like sifting through the ocean with a thimble, and after awhile it could get quite discouraging.

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I'd take #3's argument even further and suggest fear of personal harm or injury.  Let's be honest.  There were times in American history when the outlaws and criminals (the "bad guys") were more powerful than the "good guys" (aw enforcement).  The wild west days, the mob- and gang-controlled era in cities like New York and Chicago, and even--to some degree--the modern street gangs found generally on the coasts.  Today, that's not as true, and law enforcement is generally able to handle the issues of crime.  When it's not, communities feel the need to police themselves.  If it has come to that, there is undoubtedly some danger and risk involved.  While they may want to help, I'm confident many citizens are unwilling to participate out of fear. 

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In my opinion, a major reason for this would be peer pressure exerted by the other members of the community.

In many communities, the police are not very popular.  Sadly, this is especially true for many of the communities (often poor and non-white) in which community policing might be most needed.  In these communities, there is a great deal of crime and the police often have trouble telling the criminals from law-abiding people.

Even so, the law-abiding people are often reluctant to help police.  This is partly for fear of retribution from criminals.  But it is also partly because the police are often seen as a sort of occupying army that tends to abuse the members of the community.

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