Why is Lenina's looking at the moon important?

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At certain points in her life, an awareness beyond her conditioning hovers at the edges of Lenina's consciousness, and this "light" of knowledge is symbolized by the moon.

The first time this symbol appears, Lenina awakens in her childhood dormitory room, sees a beam of moonlight, and becomes "aware," for the first time, of the conditioning tapes playing. This expands her consciousness (if very slightly). It must have made an impact, because she remembers it and knows she is being conditioned.

The second time, hovering in the helicopter with Bernard Marx in the moonlight, Lenina is asked by him,

"wouldn’t you like to be free to be happy in some other way, Lenina? In your own way, for example; not in everybody else’s way.”

This scares her, and she complains that hovering over the sea under the moon with only Bernard around is upsetting. What is also upsetting her, however, is what Bernard is communicating. She won't let what Bernard is talking about—the idea of being happy in her...

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