Why were the later New Deal reforms unsuccessful?

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As the New Deal entered the mid-1930s to the late-1930s, there was less support for more New Deal programs. However, it would be a stretch to say these programs weren’t successful.

Some people began to be concerned about President Roosevelt and the New Deal. When President Roosevelt tried to pack...

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As the New Deal entered the mid-1930s to the late-1930s, there was less support for more New Deal programs. However, it would be a stretch to say these programs weren’t successful.

Some people began to be concerned about President Roosevelt and the New Deal. When President Roosevelt tried to pack the Supreme Court with judges more in line with his thinking, some Americans were concerned he was trying to grab too much power. Fortunately, his court-packing plan never went into effect, but it did raise concerns for some people about what President Roosevelt was doing. There was a growing concern about the costs associated with the New Deal programs. These programs cost billions of dollars. While unemployment dropped somewhat, it certainly didn’t drop to levels that would be considered acceptable. Some people began to question whether the cost was worth the benefits that came from these programs. When the economy went into a recession in 1937 partially because President Roosevelt pulled back on the amount of government spending on New Deal programs, this added to the concern about the effectiveness of these programs.

By the end of the 1930s, people were tiring of all the New Deal programs. Plus, world events were becoming more dangerous with the aggressive actions of Germany, Italy, and Japan. However to say later New Deal programs such as the Fair Labor Standard Act, which gave workers more protection, and the National Housing Act, which helped low-income people built homes were unsuccessful would be a stretch. The Social Security Act and the National Labor Relations Act were also very successful and very popular programs. Thus, as we entered the mid-1930s to the late-1930s, people were becoming a bit tired of hearing about and dealing with the various New Deal programs that were developed. To say these programs weren’t successful is going a bit too far.

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