Why is Jesus believed to be "God" or the Son of God?

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In response to Number Two: This same issue bedeviled many early Christians who could not conceive that Jesus could be both. Some argued that he could not be human, because all humans have human weaknesses, and Jesus was perfect. Still others, particularly the Arian "heresy" preached that Jesus was all...

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In response to Number Two: This same issue bedeviled many early Christians who could not conceive that Jesus could be both. Some argued that he could not be human, because all humans have human weaknesses, and Jesus was perfect. Still others, particularly the Arian "heresy" preached that Jesus was all human. The issue presumably was settled at the Council of Nicaea, at which Constantine himself was present, which determined that Jesus was both God and man. I am not sure that a logical explanation exists. However this is also true with many other tenets of Christianity, including the resurrection of the dead, and a number of miracles attributed to Jesus. In the Second Commandment, the Jews were told not to make unto themselves any "graven image." This included images of God himself. The reason for this is that once one "defines" an idea so that one can understand it, then one has limited it, and God cannot be so limited. Our own human understanding is such that we cannot "define" Jesus as wholly God and wholly man and make sense of it. We simply must accept it as it is, an element of faith.

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As a Christian, I do not call Jesus "God." He is the Son of God. The idea is that there are three forms of God: God the Father, His Son Jesus, and the Holy Spirit. I cannot pretend to completely understand the intricacies of the relationship of the three, but somethings are taken on faith. I have faith that I will wake in the morning, and the sun will be shining. There are no guarantees, but I take them on faith.

When I teach Sunday School, I tell my students that Jesus was sent in human form to walk with mankind and experience the existence of mankind. He was sacrificed to remove from us our sin. In the Old Testament, this was done by offering an animal as a sacrifice and burning the carcass on an alter. When Christ died, this was no longer necessary. My faith teaches us that we need only ask for forgiveness because Jesus was the ultimate sacrifice to make things right between man and God.

As with all religion, some things must be taken on faith. In a world of science, we can look to facts and compare them with ideas and judge whether the ideas are right or wrong, based on those facts.

Religion is based partially on facts. History books support some things in the Bible. However, the rest is taken on faith or not. It's not a question of right or wrong from a humanistic standpoint. We see the right and wrong of it as believers.

We make our choices and stick with them: as we do with love, art, politics, and everything else in the world. Never will everyone agree: even those within the same faith. Here it comes down to what you believe personally. What speaks to your heart has to be right for you; it does not have to be right with everyone else. It's a personal decision and a personal "journey." Not easy, but that is a long list...

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This is true, Wikipedia is not a reliable source.  If you are seriously interested in the question above, why not read the four Gospels?  Why not read The Cathecism of the Catholic Church?  Read the great Scholastic Theologists and Philosophers from Aquinas to Albertus Magnus.  Read the entire New Testament!

If you are seriously interested in an answer to this profound question, there are many places to begin.... Wikipedia is not one of them.

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Jesus is both God and Son of God, who became man to save the world from its sins. He did not want people to worship Him as a man; instead, He came to show us how to serve others, as He did when He washed His disciples' feet. Those who believe in Him can, however, perform miracles here on earth in His name as the Son of God.  Jesus is the Son of God; for His 33 years on earth, He was also a man who had free will and choice, just as we do.  He didn't ever stop being the Son of God. 

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No, please answer my question first, why do christians call Jesus GOD. That is just not right!

This is a complicated question and one that stirs up controversy. Not being one who enjoys creating divisiveness and hostility, I'll just say two things. One reason those who believe the Gospels of the New Testament equate Jesus with God is because of the words in some of the predicting texts of the Old Testament. On such text is Isaiah 9:6 in which it is proclaimed that the one to be born from King David's lineage will be called "Wonderful, Counsellor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace." Those who believe the Gospels believe that this refers to Jesus who was a descendant of King David.

Another reason is because of some of the confirming texts in the New Testament. On such text is the opening portions of the Gospel of John (ch.1) in which the Apostle John (not John the Baptist) equates the Word with God. Then John equates the Word (which is God) with the Light, so the Light is also God:

Word = God
Word = Light
Light = God
A = B = C = A

Then the Apostle John says John the Baptist came to testify to the Light (v.7) because the Light had come into the world (v.9), because the Word (equal to Light) had become flesh (v.14). John the Baptist himself said he came to testify of the Lord; the Lord equates with God. Then John said of Jesus that Jesus is the one of whom he was testifying, equating Jesus with the Light and with the Word and further equating Jesus with the Lord and with God. So Jesus is equated with the Lord and with the Light and with the Word, which all equate with God. So Jesus is called the Word; Jesus is called the Light; Jesus is called the Lord; and Jesus is called God. These are two of the reasons that those who believe the Gospels of the New Testament call Jesus God.

Lord = God
Lord = Jesus
Jesus = God
A = B
A = C
C = B
A = B = C
Word = the one being testified of
Light = the one being testified of
Lord = the one being testified of
Jesus = the one being testified of
Word = God = Light = Lord = Jesus = God

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Jesus of Nazareth, called Christ, is equated in the texts discussing him with God and the Son of God in three ways: (1) predicting and confirming text in the Old and New testaments (e.g., II Samuel 7 12-15; Psalms 2:7; John 1:1-18); (2) Jesus' own words (e.g., John 10:35-37; John 9:34-37); and (3) the witness of others, which is the most extensive of the three categories (e.g., John 1:32-36; John 20:31; Matthew 16:16; Matthew 14:33); it is recorded that even demons bore wittiness to Jesus being the Son of God (e.g., Matthew 8:29; Mark 5:7).

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If you are inclined to skepticism, you will note that the testimony from the New Testament is self-serving -- it is written by early Christians to validate and support their own beliefs.  You can argue that it is not really valid to say "Jesus is God because his followers said so."

You can argue that Jesus is seen as divine because his disciples wanted him to be seen that way after his death.  You can argue that they made claims for him that he never made for himself.  If you look at it this way (which I am not advocating for or against) Jesus is seen as divine because his followers did a good job of convincing people that he was divine.

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Jesus is to be "believed to be God," because he says he is the only Son of God.  There are two moments in the gospels that affirm this. During his Baptism, and in Matthew 11:27 and 17:5, during the Transfiguration of Christ, the Father's voice tells the apostles  that this is my "beloved son." Later, at his death, the centurion exclaims, "Surely this is the Son of God."

The Catechism of the Catholic Church includes detailed explanations of the oneness of Christ and the Father. It says, "man should not submit his personal freedom ... to any earthly power but only to God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ..."

Be mindful of the fact that the title "Christ" means "Anointed One."  That Jesus is referred to (in the Gospels) as "Lord" implicitly suggests "divine sovereignty."  Jesus tells his disciples that "no one comes to the Father, but by me" (Matthew 11:29).  In John (4:10 and 4:14) he says, "the Father has sent his Son as the savior of the world."  Thus, the expression the "Word was made flesh" defines Jesus as "God."

One may be confused because Jesus was a man, but that doesn't deny his existence as God as well. The Catholic Church clearly states that Jesus is the Son of God, and without ceasing to be God, he  became man. This is a unity of the physical and the Divine.  As the Catechism says, "The Incarnation is therefore the mystery of the wonderful union of the divine and human natures in one person of the Word."

He is, therefore, both the Son of God and God himself.

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