Why does Jem call Scout "Angel May" in chapter 6 of To Kill a Mockingbird?

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The answer can be found in Chapter 6.  The chapter begins with Jem and Scout heading over to see Dill one last time.  Being kids, the three of them are not content with just sitting around and talking to each other.  Scout wants to go find out if Mr....

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The answer can be found in Chapter 6.  The chapter begins with Jem and Scout heading over to see Dill one last time.  Being kids, the three of them are not content with just sitting around and talking to each other.  Scout wants to go find out if Mr. Avery is out tonight because they once saw him do some impressive distance urinating.  

At first we saw nothing but a kudzu-covered front porch, but a closer inspection revealed an arc of water descending from the leaves and splashing in the yellow circle of the street light, some ten feet from source to earth, it seemed to us. Jem said Mr. Avery misfigured, Dill said he must drink a gallon a day, and the ensuing contest to determine relative distances and respective prowess only made me feel left out again, as I was untalented in this area.

Dill responds by offering that they "go for a walk."  Scout is instantly suspicious.  

He sounded fishy to me. Nobody in Maycomb just went for a walk. “Where to, Dill?”

It turns out that Dill wants to head south toward the Radley house.  Atticus has already told the children to stop bothering the Radleys, so Scout protests against going.  That's when Jem calls her "Angel May."  

Jem said, “Okay.” When I protested, he said sweetly, “You don’t have to come along, Angel May.”

Jem is teasing Scout with some nam-calling.  He's basically calling her something akin to a "goody goody" or "goody two shoes."  Some more back and forth occurs until Jem finally gives the final insult and tells Scout she is acting like a girl.  That pushes her over the edge, and she agrees to go with the boys. 

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At the beginning of Chapter 6, Dill suggests that he, Jem, and Scout go for a walk. Scout senses that the boys are up to something and asks Dill where they plan to walk because "Nobody in Maycomb just went for a walk" (Lee 68). Dill points towards the Radley house, and Scout begins to protest. Jem says to Scout, "You don't have to come along, Angel May" (Lee 68). Jem calls his sister by the nickname "Angel May" to make her upset. The term "Angel May" is another way of saying "Miss Priss." Jem feels that Scout is behaving like a "girl" by complaining and protesting about traveling in the direction of the Radley place. Scout, who is a tomboy, takes offense to the nickname "Angel May" because she absolutely despises anything feminine and wants to be viewed as one of the guys. When Jem urges Scout to go, Scout asks exactly what they plan on doing. Jem tells her that he is simply going to peep into the Radley's window and see if he can get a look at Boo. Scout continues to protest until Jem says that she is acting more like a "girl" every day. Scout is deeply offended, and she decides to follow along out of fear that the boys will continue to accuse her of acting like a whiny little girl.

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