Why isn't it difficult for Ann Putnam to believe that Goody Osburn is a witch in "The Crucible"?

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sullymonster | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Ann Putnam is an unfortunate citizen of Salem who has lost all of her babies.  All seven died in child birth.  In Act I, scene i, we learn that Goody Putnam sent her daughter Ruth into the woods to speak with Tituba, in hopes of gaining information regarding her dead children. 

The reason Putnam believes that Osburn is a witch is because Osburn is the midwife who delivered Goody Putnam's children.  Angry and twisted as a result of her grief and the jealousy she has towards mothers, Goody Putnam is eager to place blame on this easy scapegoat.

The Putnams - both husband and wife - are great examples of hypocrisy and selfishness.  Ann Putnam helps to put away Goody Osburn by proclaiming her convinction, a convinction born out of grief only.  Later, Thomas Putnam is able to drag Giles Corey into court with accusations of witchery.  Putnam does this in order to acquire more land from Corey.

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