Why is the little girl wild with fear in the story “Earthquake”?

In “Earthquake,” the little girl is wild with fear because everywhere she looks chaos has been unleashed by the earthquake. On her right, a small dam has been ripped apart and a bridge across the lake broken in half. To make matters worse, the ground beneath her feet is cracking and opening.

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Although most of Ruskin Bond's short story “Earthquake” is told from the perspective of a grandfather, we are also briefly given the standpoint of another witness of this great natural disaster.

A young girl, writing in a newspaper called The Englishman , recounts her terrifying experiences of the earthquake....

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Although most of Ruskin Bond's short story “Earthquake” is told from the perspective of a grandfather, we are also briefly given the standpoint of another witness of this great natural disaster.

A young girl, writing in a newspaper called The Englishman, recounts her terrifying experiences of the earthquake. She describes herself as being “wild with fear” as she found herself caught up in the middle of this devastating cataclysm.

To her left, she saw huge clouds of dust, which she only discovered afterwards were houses falling and the earth slipping from the sides of the hills. To her right, the sight was, if anything, more disturbing. A small dam at the end of the lake had been ripped to pieces by the earthquake, causing water to rush out. The wooden bridge across the lake had been cut in half, and the sides of the lake were falling in.

If that weren't enough, the young girl could feel the ground beneath her feet cracking and opening up. It's a pretty desperate situation, and in the event, she is incredibly lucky to have survived such an almighty disaster. Under the circumstances, it's not in the least bit surprising that she was wild with fear and didn't know which way to turn.

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