Why is The Hunger Games classified as a dystopian literature?

The Hunger Games is classified as dystopian literature because it deals with a frightening world controlled by a totalitarian government that severely limits the rights of its citizens. Therefore, a battle for freedom must be fought.

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The Hunger Games is a page-turning thriller featuring Katniss Everdeen as a strong heroine who ignites a spark to overturn her totalitarian government. She becomes known as the "Girl on Fire" because of her impact.

This novel contains the following features which are typical of dystopian literature:

Conformity: In Panem,...

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The Hunger Games is a page-turning thriller featuring Katniss Everdeen as a strong heroine who ignites a spark to overturn her totalitarian government. She becomes known as the "Girl on Fire" because of her impact.

This novel contains the following features which are typical of dystopian literature:

Conformity: In Panem, citizens are forced to totally comply with their government's mandates, and the Peacekeepers are sent in to enforce the reach of the government's control in the districts. Katniss pushes back against this from the beginning, escaping the confines of District 12 to hunt for food for her hungry family. Her independent spirit both helps her win the Hunger Games and makes her a target of President Snow's fury.

Surveillance: Not only are the districts watched and monitored, but when she arrives at the Hunger Games, the killings are broadcast live, and all citizens are required to watch. If the games are going slower than expected, the Gamemakers create fires and other conflict to force action—and death.

Dehumanization of citizens: The citizens of Panem are valued so little that those in the Capitol find it entertaining to watch children die each year. Rue's death is a particularly touching example of the value of human life, symbolized by Katniss's tender treatment of Rue in those final moments, and of how little the government cares for its citizens.

A symbol that unites: The mockingjay in this novel comes to represent freedom and hope, and Katniss herself comes to embody those qualities to all the districts.

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Although the Greek word "utopia," coined by Sir Thomas More, means "no place," its homophone, "eutopia" means "a good place." The word "dystopia" therefore came to be used in the nineteenth century to mean the opposite, "a bad place," and the meaning developed in the twentieth century to refer to an unattractive fictional society set in the future or in some alternative reality. Famous dystopias include Jack London's The Iron Heel, George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four, and Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451.

Suzanne Collins's Hunger Games series contains several quintessential dystopian elements. Most significantly, it is set in a totalitarian police state, ruled by a dictator. The wealthy elite of the Capitol keep the people of the districts in poverty and subservience, and, in the Hunger Games, exploit their desperation for amusement. Several specific aspects of the society described are drawn from ancient Rome, but the author makes it clear that Panem is more repressive and tyrannical than ancient societies were able to be. The contrast between advanced technology in the hands of the elite and primitive poverty for everyone else is also characteristic of the dystopian genre.

Within the oppressive society, dystopian fiction almost always has one or more rebels, such as Winston Smith or Guy Montag, who challenge the status quo as they come to realize how repressive it is and begin to see how things might be better. Katniss Everdeen is an excellent example of this type of character in her courage and moral development.

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To answer this question, we need to define what dystopian literature is. In a nutshell, it is helpful to think of "dystopia" as the opposite of "utopia." While utopia describes an environment of peace and happiness, dystopia images a world that is frightening and unnatural.

A common characteristic of dystopian literature is autocratic governments which control every element of the lives of the story's characters. This makes The Hunger Games a textbook example of dystopian literature. The Capitol controls every part of life for Katniss and her fellow residents of District Twelve. For starters, every year, the Capitol selects two children from every district to be sent into an arena to fight to the death until there is only one survivor.

This brings me to another point about dystopian literature: it generally creates a world which feels unnatural to us. The Hunger Games is set in a futuristic world in the aftermath of the destruction of much of the United States. What's left of the country is a nation called Panem, which is divided into The Capitol, where all the wealth and power are held, and the twelve districts, which are inhabited by people who are essentially little more than slaves.

Dystopian literature generally tells the story of some kind of adventure or fight against an unjust status quo. The Hunger Games ends with Katniss forcing the Capitol's hand into allowing two victors in the seventy fourth edition of the games. Without realizing it, Katniss finishes her Hunger Games adventure by inciting a rebellion that will change everything in her world.

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Dystopian literature examines cultures which exist based upon their Utopian thoughts while using oppressive and controlling governments. Therefore, the novel The Hunger Games is a perfect example of a government working under Dystopian ideology.

The novel portrays a government, the Capitol (or District One), as the ultimately defining party responsible for the governing of the other districts. District One maintains control over the other districts in two ways.

First, District One holds the destruction of District Thirteen over the heads of the other districts. The other districts obey the Capital based upon the fear that the capitol will destroy them in the same way which they destroyed District Thirteen.

The second way District One maintains power over the other districts is the Games themselves. The games are representative of another way the Capitol can control the districts given the fear of murdering off the representative of each district.

District One reminds the other districts that without them the districts will not be able to survive. Each district has a specialization which the Capitol closely manages. The Utopian life the Capitol creates for the other districts is not noticed or recognized by anyone outside of the Capitol. The other districts are simply oppressed and controlled by fear.

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