Why is the first book of A Tale of Two Cities called "Recalled to Life"?  Please use examples, including characters and instances.

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The first book is called "Recalled to Life" because Mr. Lorry, traveling in a mail coach, receives word from Tellson's bank that someone has been "recalled to life." Mr. Lorry falls into a fitful sleep in the mail coach and dreams of a ghost who has been buried for 18...

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The first book is called "Recalled to Life" because Mr. Lorry, traveling in a mail coach, receives word from Tellson's bank that someone has been "recalled to life." Mr. Lorry falls into a fitful sleep in the mail coach and dreams of a ghost who has been buried for 18 years and is then awakened. Mr. Lorry asks this ghost in his dream whether he wants to be "recalled to life," but the ghost says he can't say.

When Lorry stops at Dover, he meets up with a young woman named Lucie Manette and tells her that her father, Dr. Manette, who has been presumed dead for 18 years, is actually still alive. Lucie travels to France with Mr. Lorry to find her father, who, after having been imprisoned for 18 years, imagines that he is still in prison. Lucie says that he should immediately be brought to England, and he begins to realize that she is his daughter. Therefore, she helps her father be recalled to life after his long imprisonment.

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The title of the first book, "Recalled to Life", refers to the character of Dr. Alexandre Manette, who has been imprisoned in France's Bastille for eighteen years.  The old Doctor is finally being released, so in a physical sense he is being set free from "death", as represented by his incarceration, and being given a chance to resume his "life".  Indeed, the text of the cryptic message affirming his release is "Recalled to Life".

Thematically, Doctor Manette is being "recalled to life" in more than just the physical sense.  Book the First, Chapter 6 presents a graphic picture of the toll the long imprisonment and isolation has taken on the Doctor's mind.  He is figuratively "dead" in that his mind is gone.  He has forgotten his identity, and spends his days fiddling absently at his workbench, and when asked for his name, replies "One Hundred and Five, North Tower".  Doctor Manette is described as a "buried man who (has) been dug out", and when asked if he is pleased about being recalled to life, he can only respond, "I can't say". 

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