Why is personification essential to Animal Farm? The characters in Animal Farm are examples of personification, the assigning of human qualities to things that are not human.

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Orwell's classic novella Animal Farm is an allegory for the Russian Revolution and the early years of the Soviet Union under Stalin's leadership. Orwell's novella is also a fable, and he utilizes personification by giving the animals in his story human characteristics. These animals allegorically represent historical figures....

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Orwell's classic novella Animal Farm is an allegory for the Russian Revolution and the early years of the Soviet Union under Stalin's leadership. Orwell's novella is also a fable, and he utilizes personification by giving the animals in his story human characteristics. These animals allegorically represent historical figures. Orwell's story can be viewed as a morality tale and a warning against authoritative regimes. By utilizing personification, Orwell appeals to a larger audience, and his messages regarding the dangers of totalitarianism are not limited to the scope of the Soviet Union. Readers can associate the animals with other politicians and archetypes in similar governments or social circumstances around the world.

The personified animals also contribute to Orwell's biting satire. By personifying unscrupulous, greedy politicians as pigs, Orwell adds humor to the story and lightens the mood. The personified animals also characterize the people they represent. For example, Boxer is a strong working horse and symbolically represents the lower-class proletariat, who exhibit similar character traits. Overall, Orwell's use of personification contributes to the satirical nature of the work, enhances the story's appeal, and broadens the scope of his message regarding the dangers of totalitarian regimes.

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In his popular and critically acclaimed novel Animal Farm, Orwell uses personification, imagery, and symbolism to make a bold statement and openly criticize a power-hungry, corrupted, unjust, and greedy totalitarian government. The novel is, basically, an allegorical satire of the political climate of Russia and Europe during the early twentieth century—specifically of the Russian Revolution and the communist movement. By giving human-like characteristics and qualities to various animals, Orwell successfully and masterfully parodies and ridicules many important political figures of that time; for instance, the idealistic and intelligent pig Old Major personifies both Vladimir Lenin and Karl Marx. Thus, personification is very important and essential for the novel, as it enables the author to deliver a powerful social and political message.

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In personification, a writer attaches human traits to an animal or object. Orwell must personify the animals on Animal Farm because he is making a comment on how human beings behave.

Animal Farm is a fable or fairytale. In both these genres, writers use animal characters to bring to light truths about human life. By using animals, these writers can simplify their storylines and distance themselves from any particular group of humans to tell a more universal tale.

Orwell, in this book, hopes to illuminate some general truths about human society. He wants readers to understand that they should pay attention, for example, to language, because language can be twisted to say the opposite of what it is intended to say. He is also trying to point out that smarter segments of society (in this case represented by the pigs) tend to take advantage of less intelligent members of society (such as the sheep). By using pigs and sheep, he is able to sidestep arguments he could get mired in about human groups—whether they really are smarter or not, whether he is being fair, etc etc.

It is possible to draw parallels between characters and events in the book and real individuals and events in the twentieth century, such as likening Napoleon to Stalin or the rebellion in which the animals take over the farm to the Russian Revolution, but you don't in any way have to make those associations to understand the message of the book.

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Personification, as stated in your question, is the assigning of human characteristics (or qualities) to non-human and non-living things. Authors tend to use personification so that readers can relate more easily to the idea or characters (if not human) in a story.

George Orwell uses personification in his novel Animal Farm. The animals of Mr. Jones' farm, Manor Farm, decide to overtake the farm and run the humans off. After taking over the farm, the animals are depicted as facing problems which humans face in their own societies.

In the novel, personification is absolutely necessary. Without the use of personification, some readers may not connect or engage with the characters in the novel given they are animals. Orwell knows that for readers to understand his message, readers need to relate to his characters. Without this relation, the message is lost.

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