Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court Questions and Answers

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Why is Marbury v Madison such an important case in Constitutional law?

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David Morrison eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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In establishing the principle of judicial review the landmark case of Marbury v Madison made the United States Supreme Court a major player in the American system of government. Prior to this case, the judicial branch had played a relatively unimportant role in domestic political life. But once the Supreme Court arrogated to itself the right to strike down laws as unconstitutional, that suddenly changed. From now on, the Court would become deeply embroiled in all manner of contentious political issues and in its many controversial rulings would, for good or ill, make a major contribution to the relevant debate.

Though the judiciary may still be regarded as the least dangerous branch of government in that it lacks a police power to enforce its rulings, it still plays a very important part in the American political system. Whatever the issue, whether it's abortion or gun rights or the funding of political parties, Americans increasingly look to the Supreme Court to provide a lead in shaping...

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Yojana_Thapa | Student

Marbury V. Madison, 1803 was a case that established the principle of Judicial Review. Judicial Review gave the supreme court the authority to declare acts of Congress unconstitutional. It was one of the series of landmark decisions of John Marshall that strengthened the federal government.