Why is Julia against the Party and Big Brother?

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Julia has an "open jeering hatred" for the Party when she talks to Winston about it. To look at, she appears to be the sort of girl who would epitomize the athletic ideals of the Party and the Junior Anti-Sex League, to which she ostensibly belongs. Julia notes that she...

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Julia has an "open jeering hatred" for the Party when she talks to Winston about it. To look at, she appears to be the sort of girl who would epitomize the athletic ideals of the Party and the Junior Anti-Sex League, to which she ostensibly belongs. Julia notes that she never "shirks" anything and indeed always "yell[s] with the crowd," as this is the only way to be safe from persecution—she is lucky in that she is able to hide in plain sight, because her physique and her youth give the impression that she is the sort of person the Party would support and who would support the Party.

In reality, however, Julia is violently against the Party and everything it stands for. She hates the Party and its moral crusade, and she rebels against it by indulging herself in the ways she prefers and which she knows the Party would condemn. For example, specifically, she is a highly sexual person who enjoys sleeping with men, something the Party is against. She hates the Party because it attacks individualism and tries to control not only people's minds, but also their bodies.

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Julia is against the party and Big Brother principally because of the limits they place on freedom. In this sense, she is like Winston, which is why they are initially drawn to one another. However, while Winston cares primarily about intellectual freedom, Orwell says that "With Julia, everything came back to her own sexuality." Julia enjoys sex and is very promiscuous. The party forces her to pretend she is frigidly pure: indeed, she is a leading member of the Junior Anti-Sex League and tells Winston that she has spent hours and hours "pasting their bloody rot all over London."

Like Winston, though, Julia realizes that the Party's hostility to sex is a symptom of a wider tyranny. They want complete control over every aspect of everyone's lives (particularly the lives of Party members). Any natural emotion, such as sexual desire or parental affection, is politically unorthodox. Ultimately, Julia hates the Party because the alternative, as she and Winston are to discover, is to be a slave to it. Any degree of intellectual, sexual, or any other kind of freedom is a rebellion.

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In 1984, Julia is Winston's girlfriend and his co-conspirator against Big Brother and the party. While Winston is an idealist and thinker who seeks to bring down the party for the sake of humanity, Julia is quite the opposite. She is a person who lives for the moment, who expresses herself through her sexuality. As such, she rebels against the party because it seeks to control her sexuality and determine her relationships with others.

While Julia works for the Junior Anti-Sex League, which promotes celibacy, she mocks and ridicules its aims and propaganda at every opportunity. As she says to Winston in the woods, for example: "Girls are always supposed to be so pure. Here's one who isn't, anyway." She then explains to Winston that she had her first love affair with another party member at the age of 16 and has, since then, slept with hundreds of men. By doing this, Julia is deliberately flouting party rules and creating loyalties to others, not to Big Brother. There is another reason, too, why Big Brother fear these sexual liaisons, as Julia explains in Part 3, Chapter 3:

'When you make love you're using up energy; and afterwards you feel happy and don't give a damn for anything. They can't bear you to feel like that. They want you to be bursting with energy all the time."

Julia is able to successfully rebel against Big Brother for much of her adult life. It is only when she meets O'Brien that her thoughtcrimes are uncovered and her life is put into serious peril.

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