Why is Hamlet angry at his mother?

Hamlet is angry at his mother because she has quickly remarried her deceased husband's brother, a man Hamlet believes pales in comparison to the memory of his father.

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Hamlet is angry at his mother because he considers her unfaithful to the memory of his father. King Hamlet had only been dead for about a month when his mother began to align herself to her former husband's brother, Claudius . They are quickly married, and Hamlet is devastated at...

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Hamlet is angry at his mother because he considers her unfaithful to the memory of his father. King Hamlet had only been dead for about a month when his mother began to align herself to her former husband's brother, Claudius. They are quickly married, and Hamlet is devastated at her speedy courtship. In act 1, scene 2, Hamlet laments his mother's quick remarriage:

A little month, or ere those shoes were old
With which she followed my poor father's body,
Like Niobe, all tears—why she, even she
(O, God, a beast, that wants discourse of reason
Would have mourned longer!), married with my
uncle,
My father's brother, but no more like my father
Than I to Hercules. (1.2.151–158)

King Hamlet was respectable, and Hamlet feels that his mother has traded his father's memory for a man far less admirable. He even feels that Gertrude might be guilty of incest for her new relationship:

O, most wicked speed, to post
With such dexterity to incestuous sheets!
It is not, nor it cannot come to good.
But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue. (1.2.151–164)

When Gertrude asks Hamlet to move past his father's death, she only angers Hamlet further. In fact, she comments that Hamlet has offended his father's memory by his actions in the palace, and he retorts, "Mother, you have my father much offended" (3.3.12–13).

In short, Hamlet feels that his mother has proven herself unfaithful to her former husband, a great King of Denmark, and that her new choice of husband isn't deserving of her love or of the crown. However, his anger toward her is tempered by the instructions of his father's ghost, who asks that Hamlet not seek retribution on Gertrude through his actions toward Claudius.

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