Why is Charles an interesting person in the short story "Charles" by Shirley Jackson?

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Shirley Jackson's "Charles" was originally published in a magazine and has since often been included in student anthologies. It is a short children's story told by a narrator about a boy, Laurie, and the troublesome boy, Charles, that he meets on his first day of kindergarten. 

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Shirley Jackson's "Charles" was originally published in a magazine and has since often been included in student anthologies. It is a short children's story told by a narrator about a boy, Laurie, and the troublesome boy, Charles, that he meets on his first day of kindergarten. 

As the story unfolds, Laurie comes home each day describing disruptive behaviors that Charles displays each day. At home, the Charles stories become part of the household. Whenever someone trips or has similar troubles, they are held up in comparison to Charles. Eventually Charles does have some good days but then returns to his poor behaviors. 

However, though interesting, these facts are not the reasons that Charles is so very interesting. Eventually Laurie's mother goes to school for a meeting hoping to meet the mother of the infamous Charles. Once there, she discovers from Laurie's teacher that there is no Charles on the roster and that Laurie has been having some trouble at school. It seems in fact that Laurie and Charles are one in the same person. That is why Charles is such an interesting person. 

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