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In chapter seventeen, Bud witnesses Herman Calloway's band rehearse for the first time and is completely blown away by their awesome performance. The chapter begins with Bud mopping the floor and pretending that he is cleaning Captain Nemo's ship while The Dusky Devastators of the Depression begin organizing their instruments...

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In chapter seventeen, Bud witnesses Herman Calloway's band rehearse for the first time and is completely blown away by their awesome performance. The chapter begins with Bud mopping the floor and pretending that he is cleaning Captain Nemo's ship while The Dusky Devastators of the Depression begin organizing their instruments on stage. While Bud is mopping, he is distracted when the band begins to play and is captivated by the music. Bud compares the jazz performance to a thunderstorm as Thug uses his drum sticks to make a sound of splashing rain and Dirty Deed's piano makes it sound like the crashing of Niagara Falls.

Bud is so mesmerized by Steady Eddie's saxophone performance that he doesn't pay attention to Miss Thomas and Mr. Jimmy's compliments regarding his cleaning. He is then blown away when Miss Thomas begins to sing and believes that the band should be named after her. Once the rehearsal is over, Bud drops his broom and cannot stop clapping. Chapter seventeen is important because it highlights the magnetic, captivating nature of jazz music, which plays a significant role in the story. It also foreshadows Bud's love for music and desire to play with the band. While this chapter is not significant in regards to plot development, Curtis utilizes vivid imagery to emphasize the beauty and influence of jazz music.

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