Why is Bud late for breakfast?  

Bud is late for breakfast because he is exhausted from the previous evening and spends the night underneath the Christmas trees outside of the library. Bud does not have an alarm to wake him up and simply sleeps in. Fortunately, Bud is able to get in line at the mission when a stranger pretends that he is his son.

Expert Answers

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At the beginning of chapter 6, Bud arrives late for breakfast at the mission but is fortunate enough to get in line when a thoughtful stranger pretends that he is his son. Bud is late for breakfast at the mission because of his harrowing night at the Amos household and the fact that he was forced to sleep underneath Christmas trees outside of the library. Bud spent the previous evening dealing with the hostile Todd Amos and was locked inside a shed with a dangerous hornets' nest. Fortunately, Bud is able to escape the shed, get revenge on Todd Amos by making him pee the bed, and travel to the library.

After fleeing the Amos household, Bud plans on spending the night in the library's basement. However, Bud discovers that the doors are locked and settles underneath several Christmas trees. Before Bud goes to sleep, he reminds himself that he needs to be up early in order to get in line at the mission. Bud realizes that if he is one minute late, he will not get breakfast. Unfortunately, Bud is exhausted from the previous night's events and sleeps late. When Bud arrives at the mission, the line is two blocks long and the person at the end refuses to allow him to get in line. Luckily, a stranger recognizes that Bud is in trouble and pretends that Bud is his son. Bud gets in line, plays along, and eventually enjoys his breakfast alongside this friendly family.

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