Why is Boo Radley innocent?

Boo Radley is innocent because he's never done any harm to anyone. Despite the many rumors that swirl around him, there's no evidence that Boo is the crazed bogeyman that everyone says he is. In reality, Boo is actually a kind, gentle soul, as can be seen through his interactions with the Finch children.

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Arthur "Boo" Radley is undoubtedly one of life's mockingbirds, an innocent soul who's never done any harm to anyone. Unfortunately, the people of Maycomb don't understand his reclusiveness and are convinced that he's some kind of crazed psychopath with violent tendencies. They love to repeat the tale that he once...

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Arthur "Boo" Radley is undoubtedly one of life's mockingbirds, an innocent soul who's never done any harm to anyone. Unfortunately, the people of Maycomb don't understand his reclusiveness and are convinced that he's some kind of crazed psychopath with violent tendencies. They love to repeat the tale that he once stabbed his old man in the leg with a pair of scissors before calmly returning to working on his scrapbook. But in actual fact, there's no evidence to suggest that he did any such thing. Like just about everything people in Maycomb claim to know about Boo, this story appears to be just another vicious, unfounded rumor.

Over the course of the book, Boo shows his true colors. His interactions with Scout and Jem reveal him to be a gentle soul, a shy, sensitive young man who has been misunderstood throughout his whole life simply because he doesn't conform to society's standards of normality. Although Boo does, strictly speaking, cause harm by killing Bob Ewell, this is only to save Scout and Jem from a particularly brutal, life-threatening assault.

In short, Boo Radley is innocent and a vulnerable person that society should protect, not subject to suspicion and vicious gossip. This innocence, in fact, is what makes him one of the book's symbolic mockingbirds.

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