Why is it ironic that the Gutres ask Espinosa's blessing and the daughter weeps?

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There's a two-fold irony here. The Gutres ask Espinosa for forgiveness but then immediately proceed to treat him like the Romans treated Christ: mocking him, spitting at him, and physically attacking him. It would appear that the Gutres have convinced themselves that Espinosa is the Second Coming of Christ, and...

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There's a two-fold irony here. The Gutres ask Espinosa for forgiveness but then immediately proceed to treat him like the Romans treated Christ: mocking him, spitting at him, and physically attacking him. It would appear that the Gutres have convinced themselves that Espinosa is the Second Coming of Christ, and yet they've learned no lessons from the original Incarnation.

What's doubly ironic is that the Gutres seek forgiveness from someone who's not in a position to give it to them. Not only is Espinosa not Jesus Christ, he doesn't even believe in God. His physical appearance may resemble that of Christ as depicted in countless paintings, murals, and icons, but he really isn't the Messiah. And, by the same token, although the Gutre girl may weep like the women who followed Christ to Golgotha, her previous actions indicate that she, in common with the rest of her family, is no follower of Christ.

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