Why is it important to Amir to tell Soraya's parents who Sohrab is?

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Afghan culture, like many cultures, has value systems based on a person's ethnic background. Sohrab's ethnicity is from one of the lowest-caste groups in Afghanistan, which is known as Hazara. Many prejudices exist against the Hazara, which in turn contribute to their horrific mistreatment at the hands of the Taliban. 

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Afghan culture, like many cultures, has value systems based on a person's ethnic background. Sohrab's ethnicity is from one of the lowest-caste groups in Afghanistan, which is known as Hazara. Many prejudices exist against the Hazara, which in turn contribute to their horrific mistreatment at the hands of the Taliban. 

When Amir brings Sohrab back to the United States, Soraya's parents continue to partake in their cultural biases, holding prejudices about Sohrab and even going so far as to refuse to call him by name, referring to him only as "that Hazara boy."

Amir, after a certain amount of time, loses patience, and reveals Sohrab's identity as his nephew, if illegitimate. It is personally important to Amir to recognize Sohrab's identity because he is unable to do so with Sohrab's father, whose death has prevented Amir from fully and directly atoning for his childhood sins.

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