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Jay Gatsby's love for Daisy Buchanan could certainly be considered religious when we examine some of the parallels between their relationship and the themes of Christianity. I do not mean to imply that Christianity is the only religion or that all religions are like Christianity, but Fitzgerald was raised...

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Jay Gatsby's love for Daisy Buchanan could certainly be considered religious when we examine some of the parallels between their relationship and the themes of Christianity. I do not mean to imply that Christianity is the only religion or that all religions are like Christianity, but Fitzgerald was raised in a Catholic home and this ideology would have permeated his life.

Consider how devoted Gatsby is to Daisy. After so many years, he thinks only of her, and spends (even wastes) all of his riches in a display for Daisy. In Christianity, especially Catholicism, devotion is highly valued. Someone who puts their faith in God and gives their time, talents, and/ or material wealth to God and the Church is likely to be admired in their religious community. The perceived benefit of devoting one's life on Earth to God is the promise of a spot in Heaven after death. Similarly, Gatsby devotes his life's work, his time, his wealth, his entire being to Daisy with the hope that they may someday be together again.

From the same perspective, Gatsby could be regarded as a sort of ascetic or martyr. He abstains from anything which he does not believe will get him closer to Daisy. Isn't it a little strange he hasn't moved on and married a different woman? Such is his devotion to her. He is willing to suffer in his longing for Daisy, alone in that big house, because he believes it is "for the cause" of being near to her again. Daisy also has the power to "redeem" Gatsby with her presence and love. If she will come and be with him, Gatsby can, spiritually speaking, be absolved of his prior sins of leaving with the army and not being wealthy enough to provide her a secure marriage.

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