Why does Friar Lawrence finally agree to marry Romeo and Juliet?

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To answer this question, take a look at act 2, scene 3. In this scene, Romeo tells Friar Lawrence that he is no longer interested in Rosaline. His new love is Juliet , and he wishes to marry her. At first, the Friar is reluctant to perform the marriage because...

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To answer this question, take a look at act 2, scene 3. In this scene, Romeo tells Friar Lawrence that he is no longer interested in Rosaline. His new love is Juliet, and he wishes to marry her. At first, the Friar is reluctant to perform the marriage because he thinks Romeo is being hasty, but, on reflection, he decides to go ahead with it because he realizes it could have a positive effect:

For this alliance may so happy prove

To turn your households' rancor to pure love.

In other words, the Friar believes that a marriage between the Montagues and the Capulets might bring their feud to an end. To describe this feud, he uses the word "rancor" which means something bitter.

Hope is the reason that the Friar allows the marriage between Romeo and Juliet. He hopes the marriage will erase all of the bitterness and replace it with pure love.

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