Why does Friar Laurence agree to marry Romeo and Juliet?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Audiences are told right away that a violent and long-standing feud has been going on between the Montague family and the Capulet family. This is an important piece of information regarding the Friar's decision to help Romeo and Juliet get married. In act 2, scene 3, Romeo visits the Friar...

Unlock
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

Audiences are told right away that a violent and long-standing feud has been going on between the Montague family and the Capulet family. This is an important piece of information regarding the Friar's decision to help Romeo and Juliet get married. In act 2, scene 3, Romeo visits the Friar and declares his love for Juliet. The Friar is rightly surprised. Romeo had just been there complaining about Rosaline and the fact that she doesn't love him back. Romeo is unfazed and begs the Friar to perform the wedding ceremony.

When and where and how
We met, we wooed and made exchange of vow,
I’ll tell thee as we pass, but this I pray:
That thou consent to marry us today.
The Friar isn't thrilled about the marriage, but the Friar does agree to the plan; however, it isn't necessarily to make Romeo and Juliet happy. The Friar agrees to the wedding because he believes that Romeo and Juliet's forbidden love might be the thing that helps the two warring families come to peace with each other.
But come, young waverer, come, go with me,
In one respect I’ll thy assistant be,
For this alliance may so happy prove
To turn your households' rancor to pure love.
Approved by eNotes Editorial Team