Examine the father's unhappiness about the marriage in "Marriage is a Private Affair."

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Okeke's unhappiness about his son's marriage is rooted in the rejection of traditional values for a more modern vision of matrimony.  The Ibo Tribe of which Okeke is committed is one that demands arranged marriages.  This is seen when Okeke writes to his son that he has arranged a bride for him.  When Nnaemeka articulates to Okeke about his choices, unhappiness reigns supreme for Okeke.  The statement of "She is the only girl I can marry" was one that invoked his father's silence.  The silent anger that resulted fed into his response to his son:

I owe it to you, my son, as a duty to show you what is right and what is wrong. Whoever put this idea into your head might as well have cut your throat. It is Satan’s work.

The father's dissatisfaction with his son exists in Nnaemeka's perceived rejection of Ibo customs.  This modern view of marriage is something that Okeke sees as an insult, something that cannot be tolerated.  It is in this where Okeke experiences dissatisfaction and feels that the marriage between Nnaemeka and Nene is one to be rejected on as many grounds as possible.  This intensity in dissatisfaction is matched by the lament and anguish that Okeke experiences at the end of the narrative.

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aritradas | Student, Grade 10 | (Level 1) eNoter

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Okeke's unhappiness about his son's marriage is rooted in the rejection of traditional values for a more modern vision of matrimony.  The Ibo Tribe of which Okeke is committed is one that demands arranged marriages.  This is seen when Okeke writes to his son that he has arranged a bride for him.  When Nnaemeka articulates to Okeke about his choices, unhappiness reigns supreme for Okeke.  The statement of "She is the only girl I can marry" was one that invoked his father's silence.  The silent anger that resulted fed into his response to his son:

I owe it to you, my son, as a duty to show you what is right and what is wrong. Whoever put this idea into your head might as well have cut your throat. It is Satan’s work.

The father's dissatisfaction with his son exists in Nnaemeka's perceived rejection of Ibo customs.  This modern view of marriage is something that Okeke sees as an insult, something that cannot be tolerated.  It is in this where Okeke experiences dissatisfaction and feels that the marriage between Nnaemeka and Nene is one to be rejected on as many grounds as possible.  This intensity in dissatisfaction is matched by the lament and anguish that Okeke experiences at the end of the narrative.

Thanks man. Extensively appreciated. Thanks again.

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