Why at the end of every chapter, does a character or the main character get hurt?

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The decision to have a main character get hurt or in trouble at the end of each chapter is a decision made by the author.  The story doesn't have to be written that way, but that is what Shusterman decided to do.  The decision makes sense though, because what that...

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The decision to have a main character get hurt or in trouble at the end of each chapter is a decision made by the author.  The story doesn't have to be written that way, but that is what Shusterman decided to do.  The decision makes sense though, because what that does is essentially end each chapter with a cliffhanger.  Readers do not like to stop reading right at the edge of a cliffhanger, so the reader is motivated to keep on reading.  By ending each chapter in this fashion, Shusterman is providing a slight nudge toward readers to keep reading the book.  TV shows do this all the time too.  Most notably shows like Lost, 24, and Prison Break.  By ending each episode with a big "what will happen?" scenario, the creators of the show increase the chances of that viewer watching the next episode to find out the answer.  Unwind uses this same tactic with decent effect.  

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